The Curse of Canaan Rightly Interpreted and Kindred Topics: Three Lectures Delivered in the Reformed Dutch Church, Easton, Pa., January and February, 1862., “Lecture II. The Negro: - Concerning his Country and Color.” [extrait]

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(1811-1884), Henry Cornelius Edgar “The Curse of Canaan Rightly Interpreted and Kindred Topics: Three Lectures Delivered in the Reformed Dutch Church, Easton, Pa., January and February, 1862., “Lecture II. The Negro: - Concerning his Country and Color.” [extrait]”, RelRace, item créé par Clément Mei, dernier accès le 15 Apr. 2024.
Contributeur Clément Mei
Sujet De la couleur des « Cananéens »
Description L’auteur affirme que l’exégèse de la Bible chrétienne ne permet pas d’établir la couleur des « Cananéens ». Si les Cushites sont d’après lui nécessairement noirs, il n’est apparemment pas certains que cela soit le cas pour les autres descendants de Cham et ceux de Canaan.
Auteur Henry Cornelius Edgar (1811-1884)
Date 1862
Éditeur Baker & Godwin, New York
Langue en

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[…] It has never been proved that the Canaanites were black. Besides, it is supposed that the Canaanites are extinct. They no longer exist as a separate people, even if there had been an inspired curse upon them, and if they had been as really negroes as the Cushites, the mere fact that there are certain persons now existing whose skin is black and whose hair is crisped neither proves that they are the descendants of him on whom Noah's curse fell, nor is it in itself a presumption of right on the part of the descendants of Japhet to enslave them.
Is it not wonderful that such a mistake as to the color of Ham's posterity, so difficult to account for and so easily refuted, should have gained so large a belief ? Possibly a majority of those whom I address have to this day believed that Noah's curse was by the Lord's authority ; and that it rested upon Ham and all his children ; and that this curse of bondage was designed to continue to the end of time ; and that all the family of Ham were struck black ; and that that color is the Lord's mark by which all the world may know who may be subjected to servitude.
It is impossible to meliorate the condition of these downtrodden people while such gross mistakes and such bitter prejudices exist respecting them. It is to correct some of these errors, and to remove, if possible, at least, in some measure, this prejudice, that I have undertaken to expound the curse of Canaan, and to speak on topics kindred to it.
We are speaking of color as a variety in the human family. We have found in the Bible that the Cushite alone was black, and that neither of the other three sons of Ham was of this complexion. We have not a word as to the time when, or the reason why, or the causes by which, this variety was introduced. Let us look at some of the theories on this general question of color.
The mark which the Lord set upon Cain, - what was it ? Was it a change of color by which he might be known ? The Lord set a mark upon Cain because he had killed his brother. […]